About Korfball

The sport of Korfball:

A brief explanation of the game:

Korfball is a fast-paced and dynamic game that is the only truly mixed team sport in the world. The sport is accessible to anyone, whether young or old, male or female, beginner or international athlete. Teams of four female players and four male players try to shoot a ball into a korf (basket). The sport’s main characteristics encompass all-round skills, co-operative play, controlled physical contact and gender equality. Teams of eight players divide into two sections – two male, two female in each section. Playing area consists of two large squares joined along the centre line, each square with a ‘korf’ set in one third from the back line. One section starts the game in attack, the other in defence. Sections swap roles after two goals have been scored.

More information:

For more information on the sport of Korfball, please see the Discover Korfball page on the EKA website. Or why not YouTube it!

Korfball in the UK and the South West:

Korfball has been played in England for over 60 years. The South West Korfball Association is one of the fastest growing in the whole of Europe, having grown by 60% in the last twelve months. Since its establishment four years ago, the SWKA is now the second largest Korfball Association in the whole of the UK.

Korfball’s governing bodies:

The International Korfball Federation is responsible for korfball activities worldwide. The IKF is recognised by the International Olympic Committee (IOC), and is a member of the International World Games Association, the Association of IOC Recognised International Federations (ASRIF), Sport Accord, and the World Anti-Doping Agency.

Below the IKF are the national federations. In the UK, there are three national federations: the England, Scotland, and Wales Korfball Associations (EKA, SKA, and WKA, respectively). These associations are responsible for all korfball activities within their borders.

Below the national associations are the Area Associations. The South West Korfball Association (SWKA) is one such association. These associations are responsible for running the Area’s leagues and working with and for the clubs within the area on all korfball-related matters.